Did You Know Oysters are Hermaphrodites??

October is National Seafood Month … but, if you’ve spent anytime swimming around this mermaid’s blog, then you already know that. October is also Breast Cancer Awareness Month … and to help raise awareness, The Oceanaire Seafood Room is offering Pink Ribbon Oysters throughout October with 25 percent of every purchase donated to the Breast Cancer Research Foundation.

Pink Ribbon Oysters are wild oysters, harvested by divers in the cold waters of Long Island Sound. After harvesting, every single one of the delicious little bivalvia are cleaned and graded by industry specialists before making it to the table. As for the flavor, Pink Ribbon Oysters are salty (no surprise), petite (think Blue Points, for my fellow oyster lover) and fleshy.

“We are thrilled to offer guests decadent Pink Ribbon Oysters throughout Breast Cancer Awareness Month,” said Wade Wiestling, Vice President of Culinary Development. “The combination of one-of-a-kind seafood and charitable giving was a natural fit for the Oceanaire.”

5 Fun Facts About Oysters

  1. Only eat oysters during months with the letter “R.” When water is warm—i.e. the summer months—there is a higher prevalence of the marine bacteria known as Vibrio vulnificus… but, MOST* people aren’t susceptible to infection from the bacteria and are free to enjoy the little mollusks 356 days a year.
  2. There are boy mollusks and girl mollusk. True, but both male and female oysters have gonads which produce both eggs and sperm—which means they are hermaphrodites and can change gender if they want to. Easy Peasy.
  3. It’s ALIVE. Or is it? If you’ve enjoyed the delicacy on the half shell, then yes, chances are the little creatures are still alive. But that’s OK. It means they’re fresh … and no one wants to eat an oyster that’s been “living” in a fridge for weeks on end.
  4. Oysters have gills.Oysters are like fish in that they take oxygen from water as it passes through their gills, and discard the carbon monoxide. And, believe it or not, the little guys (and gals) also have hearts, kidneys, stomachs and intestines. Who knew!
  5. Oysters are an aphrodisiac. Well, the famed 18th-century lover Casanova ate 50 oysters for breakfast every morning. Seemed to work for him, but the official verdict is still out.

Meet me at The Oceanaire? I’ll buy you an oyster 😉 !!

The Oceanaire Seafood Room | 30 South Meridian Street, Suite 100 | TheOceanaire.com

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Hey there. I’m Shauna—a West Coast transplant in the landlocked state of Indiana … when I moved here I missed the beaches, the mountains, the desert, the rivers … and it took me a while to find places nearby that paralleled my old stomping grounds. BUT. Now that I’ve lived here for over 15 years, I’ve had time to explore the region and you know what? It’s amazing. There’s so much to do—from skiing in northern Michigan to relaxing lakeside in southern Kentucky to rocking the nightlife in one of the many metropolitan areas. And I love it here. I really do. BUT. I do miss the sea … and the sand and the rush of the waves … the smell of seawater … even the sting of too much sun after a day spent lollygagging at the beach. And I miss the constant supply of seafood and shellfish and riverfish? About that … since I’ve moved to the Midwest I’ve noticed that a lot of people here don’t consider fish that come from the river seafood … I’m not sure I agree, but hence the new word I’ve created, “riverfish” … time will tell if Webster picks it up ; ) So this little blog is my way of bringing a little bit of sea life (or is it sealife?) to the Midwest. Here you’ll find all kinds of information … some that you might find more useful than others—like where to find the best seafood (and riverfish) in the Midwest. And some, you might just find amusing … or not. Either way, and if nothing else, I hope you leave my little space here on the world wide web a little refreshed and maybe even a little inspired to bring a little bit of the ocean home with you. (Yes, I did use the word “little” four times in one sentence … it’s OK … mermaids like to repeat themselves.) Cheers! The Midwest Mermaid Oh, and if your curious, yes, I do actually write for a living … if you want to know about the organizations I work with and the publications where you can find my land legs, swim on over to the “Portfolio” tab … and thanks for visiting.

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